pediatric oncology

Primary care following treatment of a child with cancerThe progress in treating cancer in children has been revolutionary, and the evidence base for providing long-term psychosocial care for their families has grown as well.
Medical marijuana for children with cancerPediatricians have had concerns about the known risks of marijuana use in children. What’s next for kids with cancer?
When cancer strikes a family: Psychosocial issues in pediatric oncology
When cancer strikes a family: Psychosocial issues in pediatric oncologyA child’s cancer diagnosis presents psychosocial issues that the community pediatrician needs to assess and treat for the total well-being of the child, siblings, and parents.
Hypertension higher in childhood cancer survivorsAdults who have survived childhood cancer are about 10 years ahead of their peers in terms of developing hypertension, according to a new report.
Pediatric high-grade glioma is not one tumor type but manyStratifying tumors by their clinical characteristics and underlying biology will enable future targeting of specific therapies for glioma in children.
Personalized and costly, but new ALL treatment offers hopeA new customized therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) offers high remission rates but at a substantial cost, and only at specialized cancer centers.
The price of surviving childhood cancerSurviving cancer is challenging enough, but now a recent report highlights the fact that survivors face double the chronic health challenges of the general population as a result of curative cancer therapies.
FDA expands ipilimumab approval to pediatric melanomaThe US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the approval of ipilimumab (Yervoy) to include the treatment of pediatric melanoma patients 12 years and older with unresectable or metastatic disease.
Why do so many kids die so soon following a cancer diagnosis?While improvements have been made to childhood cancer mortality rates, a recent research study aims to identify how many children die before being able to start treatment, and what interventions can be put in place to improve their chances.
Boy with ear pain and facial weaknessA 13-year-old boy with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes (T1D) presents to the emergency department (ED) for evaluation of left ear pain and left facial weakness.