uveal melanoma

Promising advances in uveal melanoma treatmentImmunotherapy and other investigational treatments appear to be promising for uveal melanoma, according to Carol Shields, MD.
Improving the prognosis of uveal melanomaAbout one-half of people diagnosed with uveal melanoma ultimately develop metastatic disease. A look at survival rates for patients with uveal melanoma indicate that not much has changed in the past several decades or even for the past 100-plus years. Nevertheless, there is good reason to be optimistic about the future considering the recent developments and ongoing research in this field, said Mary Beth Aronow, MD, at Ocular Oncology and Pathology 2016.
Rapid responders may offer clues to optimize immune therapySome patients respond more rapidly to immune therapies like ipilimumab, and clinicians have observed delayed toxicities with prolonged use of checkpoint inhibitors; effective treatments for subtypes of melanoma, such as uveal melanoma, have not yet emerged.
Improving the prognosis for uveal melanomaResults of a commercially available, genetic profiling test for uveal melanoma can be used to determine patients at high risk for metastasis. Understanding of the genetics of the tumor is also being applied to develop targeted therapies that may improve patient survival.
What ophthalmologists need to know about ocular cancerOphthalmologists may be first to make a diagnosis of eye cancer in patients who present with ocular tumors and should be aware of the various forms and types of disease.
Metastatic mortality hinges on risk stratificationWhile the control rate for uveal melanoma approaches 100%, disease-related mortality for this cancer has remained essentially unchanged over the past eight decades. According to Thomas M. Aaberg Jr., MD, identifying patients at greatest risk for metastasis and providing them with prophylactic treatment are key to altering mortality outcomes in the future.