standard of care

Were these infant’s delays secondary to misapplication of a vacuum extractor?The plaintiff alleged that the infant’s injuries were caused by traumatic damage during delivery; specifically, from the vacuum extractor. The plaintiff’s argument was that when the vacuum extractor pulled on the infant’s head it caused damage, evidenced by the intraventricular bleed.
Should surgery be standard of care in uncomplicated appendicitis? (VIDEO)For Contemporary Pediatrics, Dr Bobby Lazzara discusses a large study published in Pediatrics that examined what happened when children were nonsurgically managed for appendicitis, often with antibiotics, and compared the results with their peers who had received surgical treatment.
Early delivery to blame for child’s disability?The plaintiffs alleged that a failure to properly monitor the patient and administer steroids for lung maturity; to place her on bed rest; or administer tocolytics to prolong pregnancy resulted in premature delivery, brain injury and neurologic developmental delays.
Was there fraudulent coding just because I used a novel treatment approach?How does the standard of care relate to medical coding?
Integrative pharmacy: Changing public perceptionsYou know how integrative pharmacy is practiced. Here's what to do about the pushback.
Did negligence cause patient’s death?
Did negligence cause patient’s death?Immunosuppressed patient with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma succumbs to death. Was the dermatologist who did his skin evaluations negligent?
Many low-income women with false labor want to remain in hospitalIn the first study looking at latent labor experiences among disadvantaged populations of women, researchers at Baylor University’s Louise Herrington School of Nursing and Parkland Health & Hospital System found that 41% of low-income women discharged from the hospital due to a diagnosis of false or early labor did not want to be sent home.
Payers could curb defensive medicine with data and standardizationPhysician behavior unaffected by malpractice risk.
Can scarring lead to a negligence lawsuit?Dr. Laser has been doing laser procedures for more than a decade. He has a great reputation and thousands of happy patients. Two years ago he performed a laser procedure on a patient who unfortunately scarred afterward. The procedure was undertaken in the same manner as hundreds of other similar procedures performed by Dr. Laser. He also obtained a signed consent form from his patient warning her about the risk of scarring.
What do courts decide when physicians' standards of care differ?A patient has melanoma in situ removed from her face and develops sepsis. She sues her doctor, claiming he should have explained that infection could lead to sepsis and death. Was his warning about the risk of infection enough? What is he required to disclose during his informed consent with his patient?