stone disease

Ureteroscopy: Surgeons show techniques, tips in videosIn these videos, high-volume stone surgeons demonstrate novel approaches to classification, visualization, and treatment of stones.
Urology FDA approvals of 2016Urology-related FDA approvals from 2016 encompassed drugs and devices for prostate cancer, renal cell carcinoma, bladder cancer, stone disease, and more.
‘Smart’ water bottle may help with stone preventionDespite the excruciating nature of kidney stones, many people can't manage to lower their risk by simply drinking more liquid. Now, a new study finds that one potential tool—a water bottle with a built-in consumption sensor and smartphone link—accurately tracks how much people drink.
Top 10 stone disease articles of 2016A comparison of dusting versus basketing, the question of whether shock wave lithotripsy should be retired, and an expert interview on difficult stones were among the most-read Urology Times articles on stone disease in 2016.
Urolithiasis mortality rate high in lower income nationsResults of a study analyzing global trends in mortality attributable to urolithiasis show that the rate declined over a recent 20-year period.
Medical expulsive therapy or bust?
Medical expulsive therapy or bust?Whether or not medical expulsive therapy (MET) is a sound recommendation for patients with kidney or ureteral stones is a matter of debate.
Urolithiasis in children
Urolithiasis in childrenUrolithiasis occurrence is increasing in both adults and children in the United States, with nearly 1 in 11 adults having a stone at some time in their life. Unfortunately, stone occurrence in children also appears to have increased from 1% to 2% in the 1950s to 1970s to almost 10%.
Anticoagulant use in URS patients ups bleeding riskPatients undergoing ureteroscopy while remaining on anticoagulant therapy may be at increased risk for bleeding complications, including significant bleeding events and unplanned returns to the operating room, according to a retrospective study
Stone retrieval device shows high versatility, efficacyResults from bench studies favor a new open-faced stone retrieval device (Dakota, Boston Scientific) for having greater versatility, efficacy, and durability compared with a competing product, and the in vitro performance of the new instrument is consistent with early clinical experience, says Roger L. Sur, MD.
Use new data to inform unique patient group"Increasingly, urologists are faced with patients who cannot safely discontinue anticoagulation or antiplatelet medications, even in the face of an impending surgical procedure. This is a trend that is likely to continue into the foreseeable future," writes Brian R. Matlaga, MD, MPH.