strabismus

Questionnaires differ in strabismus quality-of-life measuresTwo questionnaires used to measure quality of life in people with strabismus overlap but differ in important areas, according to researchers.
Flying Eye Hospital aims to prevent blindness worldwide
Flying Eye Hospital aims to prevent blindness worldwideA unique, third-generation Flying Eye Hospital is giving wings to Orbis' mission to prevent blindness worldwide. The hospital is the world’s only mobile ophthalmic teaching hospital located on an MD-10 aircraft, and is the byproduct of six years of work by experts in aviation and hospital engineering.
Reducing pain during postop pediatric strabismus surgeryIn a randomized study, patients receiving bupivocaine had lower pain scores than the control group in the first 30 minutes after surgery. However, other factors may also play a role.
Strabismus much more than orbital pulleys and musclesNew discoveries about extraocular muscles have widened the range of diagnoses and surgical techniques for strabismus.
Inverted Brown pattern may warrant inferior oblique weakening procedureIn cases of an inverted Brown pattern, a large inferior oblique weakening procedure may be the first procedure to perform—even though the inferior oblique muscle is not significantly overacting.
Defending adjustable sutures in strabismus surgeryIt may be easier than ever for strabismus surgeons to adopt adjustable sutures thanks to a short tag noose adjustable suture technique that allows for optional suture adjustment, according to David G. Hunter, MD, PhD.
Examining pediatric eyesThe common eye problems found in adults, developing over decades of life as acquired disease, are different in children. There is an old pediatrics adage that “children are not little adults.” This is certainly true when it comes to the pediatric eye exam that many allied health care personnel find themselves facing, often with dread, on a weekly or daily basis.
Share this pediatric vision checklist with your patientsBascom Palmer Eye Institute has created a helpful checklist for parents, detailing signs and symptoms of pediatric vision problems to watch for.
Reviewing pediatric primary care optometryPrimary care optometrists play a crucial role in the wellbeing of a child, often serving as the gatekeeper for the critical care of our youngest patients. After hours, these doctors must sift through a vast array of evidence-based literature to foster the insight required just to get through a day in the life.
Instrument-based vision screening: Update and reviewInsurance companies are now beginning to compensate pediatricians for performing photoscreening, billed under Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) code 99174. We applaud the efforts of the many pediatricians, pediatric ophthalmologists, and state chapters of the AAP who have aggressively petitioned insurance companies to cover this important service for our patients. —Andrew J Schuman, MD, Section Editor