type 1 diabetes

Autoimmune drug pipeline: What health execs should watchNew drugs for RA, psoriasis, type 1 diabetes and Crohn’s disease—some recently approved and others coming down the pipeline—could have an impact on the industry.
Diabetes: Are we underestimating its prevalence?A new report shatters earliest estimates that just 0.25% of teens have diabetes, placing that figure closer to 1% plus an estimated 17.7% with prediabetes.
Pitfalls in pediatric type 1 diabetes care
Pitfalls in pediatric type 1 diabetes careType 1 diabetes accounts for over 90% of diabetes in children and adolescents worldwide, and it is estimated that about 78,000 young persons are diagnosed annually.
CPF: A funding resource for community pharmacies
CPF: A funding resource for community pharmaciesCPF puts its money where its mission is.
New therapy to fight pediatric hypoglycemiaFor parents of a child with type 1 diabetes, hypoglycemia can be a scary—and fatal—complication, but a treatment is in development that gives parents and caregivers a new way to keep glucose levels in check.
"Smart" patch may eliminate need for insulin shots in diabeticsA new, painless “smart insulin patch” lowered blood glucose in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes for up to 9 hours, according to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Patients: Trust your doctor, not public figuresFormer Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee is not an expert on diabetes, but he's telling patients he is a better resource than their own physician.
New, more potent diabetes drug approved by FDAFDA has approved a new once-daily, long-acting basal insulin, Toujeo (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection, 300 U/mL, Sanofi) for the treatment of adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is described as a more potent follow-up to the manufacturer’s insulin product Lantus (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection, 100 U/mL).
High blood glucose in kids may slow brain growthChildren with chronically high blood glucose levels are more likely to show slower brain growth than children with normal glucose levels, a new study has found.
The changing face of diabetes: How to guide teens and young adultsDiabetes has emerged as one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood and adolescence. In order to guide these young people, healthcare providers need to engage them on their own terms, using their own media.