ranibizumab

Plasma-free VEGF level decreases with aflibercept, bevacizumabCompared with intravitreous ranibizumab, the decreases in the plasma-free VEGF levels were greater with intravitreous aflibercept and bevacizumab in patients with diabetic macular edema.
Early detection in AMD: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cureInterventions in AMD are most effective when administered early in the disease course. Studies provide evidence supporting this and a number of tools and techniques can be used to improve rates of early detection to improve patients’ long-term outcomes.
Does dexamethasone implant add benefit in ranibizumab patients?The addition of dexamethasone implant (Ozurdex, Allergan) to a continuing regimen of ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech) did not produce results in visual acuity outcomes that differed from those achieved with ranibizumab alone at 6 months. However, there was an improvement in the central macular thickness on OCT in patients.
Intravitreal implant could bring significant cost savings to NHS EnglandA study has revealed that a budgetary saving per treated patient with the fluocinolone acetonide implant (Iluvien) versus ranibizumab (Lucentis) could lead to a significant cost-saving to NHS England.
Treat-and-extend protocol reduces burden of anti-VEGF treatment for DMEResults of the prospective TREX-DME study provide an evidence base for using a treat-and-extend protocol for administering anti-VEGF injections for eyes with diabetic macular edema.
Subretinal therapy offers promise of lighter treatment burden for AMDRGX-314 gene therapy offers patients the potential for a lower treatment burden with one subretinal injection of a gene therapy delivering an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor protein.
Study explores ranibizumab as treatment for ROPIntravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech) appears to be effective for treatment of severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and associated with less persistent suppression of systemic VEGF compared with bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech), according to research reported by Shunji Kusaka, MD.
Outcomes differ from trials with ‘real-world’ anti-VEGF therapy for DMEThe visual outcomes after anti-VEGF therapy administered to treat diabetic macular edema in the “real world” do not achieve those reported in randomized clinical trials. Eyes with better baseline visual acuity are disproportionately affected.
Role of corticosteroids uncertain in AMD managementThere is no doubt that inflammation is a component of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and yet the role of corticosteroid treatment in the management of eyes with AMD remains uncertain, said Marc de Smet, MD, PhD.
Anatomic outcome more precise in defining DME treatment failureThe goal of treatment for diabetic macular edema is to maintain or improve vision, but improvement of edema is a better metric for determining whether the treatment is having a benefit or failing.