ranibizumab

Subretinal therapy offers promise of lighter treatment burden for AMDRGX-314 gene therapy offers patients the potential for a lower treatment burden with one subretinal injection of a gene therapy delivering an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor protein.
Study explores ranibizumab as treatment for ROPIntravitreal ranibizumab (Lucentis, Genentech) appears to be effective for treatment of severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and associated with less persistent suppression of systemic VEGF compared with bevacizumab (Avastin, Genentech), according to research reported by Shunji Kusaka, MD.
Outcomes differ from trials with ‘real-world’ anti-VEGF therapy for DMEThe visual outcomes after anti-VEGF therapy administered to treat diabetic macular edema in the “real world” do not achieve those reported in randomized clinical trials. Eyes with better baseline visual acuity are disproportionately affected.
Anatomic outcome more precise in defining DME treatment failureThe goal of treatment for diabetic macular edema is to maintain or improve vision, but improvement of edema is a better metric for determining whether the treatment is having a benefit or failing.
Real-world outcomes with aflibercept better in treatment-naïve patientsAfter 12 months of treatment with intravitreal aflibercept injections, both treatment-naïve and pre-treated patients demonstrated visual acuity gains. Visual acuity improvement was higher in treatment-naïve patients.
Aflibercept rivals laser for diabetic retinopathyIntravitreal aflibercept worked better than panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) in a new head-to-head trial, according to researchers.
Ranibizumab proves effective for DMO in NHS clinicsPatients treated for diabetic macular oedema with ranibizumab in the UK National Health Service (NHS) are getting benefits similar to those seen in clinical trials, according to a new study
Latest concepts in steroid therapy for diabetic macular oedemaSteroids are an important second-line treatment for the treatment of diabetic macular oedema. While side effects remain a concern, modern formulations of intravitreal steroid allow the treatment to be tailored to the individual patient.
The AAO's preferred practice patterns for AMDHigh-level evidence supports the use of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD), but falls short of recommending any one agent over another in terms of efficacy or safety, said Paul Sternberg Jr., MD.
Anti-VEGF drugs: Safe and effective for treating DMEData from large randomized trials indicate that diabetic macular edema can be treated safely and effectively with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies.