Raindrop, ReVision Optics

Managing presbyopia with evolving inlay technologyInnovation does not cease and nor should our ability to stay abreast of the latest surgical options for our patients. The ever-growing population of presbyopes is endless, and the desire to rid oneself of spectacles is unquenchable.
Visual acuity, other tasks appear unaffected by inlay decentrationDecentration of less than 0.75 mm from a light-constricted pupil with a novel corneal inlay for the surgical correction of presbyopia does not affect visual acuity, task performance, or severity of halos and glare.
How to manage vision changes over time post-LASIK
How to manage vision changes over time post-LASIKHow often have you heard a post-LASIK patient say his surgery “isn’t working anymore” or it has “expired?” While the corneal tissue that was ablated is gone forever, eyes can change over time, and laser vision correction does not stop time.
Managing presbyopia heading into the year 2020Patients don’t have to wait for 2020 to achieve 20/20 vision at near without spectacles or contact lenses. Rather, the advancements we have seen just in the past few years should be enough to help manage their expectations.
How has ophthalmology changed in 2016?
How has ophthalmology changed in 2016?As the end of the year approaches, we wanted to take a look back at the predictions our Editorial Advisory Board members made for 2016 and see how far we’ve come in the last 12 months.
Minimally invasive surgical solutions for presbyopia
Minimally invasive surgical solutions for presbyopiaPresbyopia, an age-related loss of accommodative amplitude of the eye resulting in near and intermediate vision deficits, begins to affect most people once they reach their early 40s.
Corneal inlays still altering landscape of presbyopiaThe prospect of an expanding armamentarium of corneal inlays for presbyopia correction is an exciting development, said Jay A. Pepose, MD, PhD.
Hydrogel corneal inlay studied as 'valuable' tool for presbyopicOutcomes from up to 12 months of follow-up in a prospective case series including 25 patients show promising results using the transparent, hydrogel corneal inlay for correction of presbyopia.