Peter J. McDonnell, MD

Bascom Palmer takes top honors in Ophthalmology Times Best Programs SurveyAfter a seven-year hiatus, Ophthalmology Times resumed its Best Programs Survey this fall. While a few new names popped up on the list, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, remained at the top of the Best Overall Program category, followed again by the Wilmer Eye Institute at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore. Number three in the overall list has a new name with Dean McGee Eye Institute at the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City—the first time that institute has appeared in the top category since the survey’s inception 20 years ago.
Have we dodged another Zika bullet?Now with mosquito season past in most parts of North America, it seems we can be confident the predicted spread will not come to pass—at least in this year.
Evidence-based ophthalmologyWhy it is that ophthalmologists who read the same papers in the same journals have such widely varying approaches?
May the force be with you, too
May the force be with you, tooTomasso, a vitreoretinal surgeon, recently shared a blog by someone who calls him/herself “Neuroskeptic”.Neuroskeptic penned a spoof “scientific” article about midichlorians, which are the little organisms inside cells that give Jedi Knights (the good guys in the “Star Wars” movies) their powers (and unfortunately, confer those same powers to certain bad guys, like Darth Vader).
Something we may be missing
Something we may be missingMy friend, Dave, an oculoplastic surgeon, trained the same time I did. He was extremely intelligent and possessed a great sense of humor. A real jokester, he provided free cosmetic services to his office staff, and claimed in their presence that his treatments prevented them from frowning at him.
Harnessing laziness to do goodMany maintain that rising early, getting to work, accomplishing a lot during the day, and getting to bed at a reasonable hour is the route to success in life. But a body of evidence suggests that human behavioral tendencies to do too much, in some cases, can reduce the likelihood of a good result. At the same time, laziness can produce outcomes that are either negative or positive.
Spectacles saved our republicSometimes, we ophthalmologists—accustomed as we are to high-success rates with our therapeutic interventions—become inured to the impact our efforts can have on patients’ lives.
A wake-up call for physiciansEveryone knows the name of Warren Buffett, the famous octogenarian-billionaire businessman and investor. His folksy persona and investment insights/elevated returns have earned him the appellation of “The Oracle of Omaha.” His estimated net worth of more than $74 billion makes him one of the wealthiest people on the planet.
Fired by the 'captain of industry'
Fired by the 'captain of industry'No doubt, you, dear reader, have experienced the unpleasant situation of terminating an employee for one reason or another (poor performance, financial exigencies, etc.). But I would hope that we ophthalmologists perform this task in a more professional manner than that exemplified by The Captain of Industry.
Is it talent or skill?There is an ongoing controversy surrounding the importance of talent for athletes, musicians, physicians, and other professionals. Some argue talented people are better at learning certain things (developing skills). What is the truth when it comes to ophthalmology?