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Pediatric Immunization Resource Center

CDC: Most children don’t get full benefit of flu vaccineMost children are not being adequately vaccinated against influenza, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which also just published a new report demonstrating the efficacy of the vaccine in reducing influenza-related deaths in children.
HPV vaccination rates are rising but have far to goDespite controversy surrounding the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, more adolescents and young adults are getting vaccinated. However, overall vaccination rates of HPV compared with other teenaged-years vaccines are still low, says the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Bacteremia in infants: Time for a new approach?Bacteremia is now a rare event in previously healthy children aged 3 to 36 months because of the introduction of routine immunization with the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV).
Choice of needle size when vaccinating childrenAmong concerns with administering these multiple and frequent immunizations in young children are the potential pain and adverse effects associated with injections. Along with inducing pain in some children, the early negative experience of needle-related procedures can interfere with adherence to immunization schedules and create long-lasting effects of anxiety and stress around needle-related procedures that remain into adulthood.
CDC, AAP release 2017 pediatric vaccine recommendationsThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have released updated pediatric immunization schedules for 2017.
HPV series completion lags among boysFindings of a recently published observational retrospective cohort study point to a need for increased efforts to improve timely completion of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine series among boys.
How best to reduce injection pain—lidocaine creamA comparison of 4 levels of pain management of routine vaccine injections found that of the remedies tried, only liposomal lidocaine applied at the injection site provided consistent relief.
Why aren’t pediatricians recommending HPV vaccination more strongly?In a recently published essay to address this question, the authors suggest that pediatricians may present human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine as optional or less urgent than other adolescent vaccines because they do not often read or hear about their patients’ being affected by HPV-associated cancers, which generally strike older populations.
Push the HPV vaccineTo reduce human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, pediatricians must strongly recommend the underutilized HPV vaccine in preteens.
Vaccine education project focuses on the pediatric populationEnhancing parental knowledge about vaccine science is one strategy for promoting vaccination adherence and overcoming vaccine hesitancy. An alternative approach is to target school-aged children as they are the parents of the future.