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Pediatric Immunization Resource Center

CDC, AAP release 2017 pediatric vaccine recommendationsThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have released updated pediatric immunization schedules for 2017.
HPV series completion lags among boysFindings of a recently published observational retrospective cohort study point to a need for increased efforts to improve timely completion of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine series among boys.
How best to reduce injection pain—lidocaine creamA comparison of 4 levels of pain management of routine vaccine injections found that of the remedies tried, only liposomal lidocaine applied at the injection site provided consistent relief.
Why aren’t pediatricians recommending HPV vaccination more strongly?In a recently published essay to address this question, the authors suggest that pediatricians may present human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine as optional or less urgent than other adolescent vaccines because they do not often read or hear about their patients’ being affected by HPV-associated cancers, which generally strike older populations.
Push the HPV vaccineTo reduce human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, pediatricians must strongly recommend the underutilized HPV vaccine in preteens.
Vaccine education project focuses on the pediatric populationEnhancing parental knowledge about vaccine science is one strategy for promoting vaccination adherence and overcoming vaccine hesitancy. An alternative approach is to target school-aged children as they are the parents of the future.
Flu vaccine recommendations for the 2016 - 2017 seasonEgg allergies are no longer a contraindication for influenza vaccination, but intranasal mists won’t be an alternative for the shot during this year’s flu season, either, according to new recommendations released by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
Live attenuated influenza vaccine “shelved” for poor efficacyRecent data has revealed the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), also known as the “nasal spray” vaccine, to be grossly ineffective, leading to the ACIP’s decision not to recommend its usage. As such, healthcare providers must be judicious in their choice of influenza vaccine with their patients.
How mom's flu shot protects babyFlu shots given to mothers during pregnancy provided protection for their babies against three common strains of influenza for several weeks after birth, according to a new report.
Febrile seizure risk and vaccinesMaintaining the currently recommended vaccination schedule of influenza, pneumococcal conjugate, and diphtheria/tetanus/acellular pertussis vaccines in young children as put forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is likely the best way to manage immunization in this patient population despite the slightly increased risk for febrile seizure.