pediatric guidelines

New guidelines highlight pediatric mental health needsToo many children with depression go undiagnosed and untreated, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. Updated guidelines should address this standard of care.
Is the end of evidence-based guidelines near?Dr. Bass’ recent article in Contemporary Pediatrics, “Personalized medicine, right drug, right patient, right time,” provides a miniature but profound view of what may be the future of pediatric healthcare: focusing on healthcare that is truly individualized through precision science in the areas of diagnosis and treatment, rather than generalized, population-based treatment guidelines.
Effects of body modification are more than just skin deepAAP’s first ever clinical report on body modification guides pediatricians on medical precautions and counseling practices.
Updated clinical guidelines for childhood hypertensionNew guidance for pediatric hypertension makes it easier for primary care physicians to identify children and adolescents with high blood pressure and manage them in an appropriate manner.
Alternative medicine guidelines get an updateOne in 10 children and teens are using complementary medicine, but they and their parents seldom include pediatricians in their plans. A new report offers guidance on complementary therapies and how to talk to clients about them.
OME management often strays from guidelinesMost physicians are not adhering to recommendations on otitis media management, according to a new report from the American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF).
Functional constipation: A guideline reviewFunctional constipation in children is no news to pediatricians. What may be news is that recommendations on how to diagnose and treat this common malady keep evolving as more evidence becomes available.
AAP updates media use guidelinesThe American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued updated recommendations for media use by children that attempt to reconcile their increasing exposure to media with their developmental needs.
Updated guideline for “brief resolved unexplained events”A recently published 2016 guideline by the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends replacing “apparent life-threatening event” or ALTE with the more accurate term “brief resolved unexplained event” or BRUE.
How to manage pediatric celiac diseaseOngoing lab tests and assessments are important in the management of pediatric celiac patients, according to newly released guidelines.