patient satisfaction

The definitive guide to sustained patient engagementThe push for value-based healthcare—higher quality, better access, and lower cost—has opened up the door for technology to automate elements of care at a much lower cost.
Putting process over patients continues to hurt healthcare
Putting process over patients continues to hurt healthcare American ingenuity in healthcare over the last two decades has caused a number of problems in dire need of solutions.
Shining a Mirror on GripesAlthough it is the most fundamental of all things that physicians do, communicating has never been a teaching priority in medical school. The result is that we blame patients for our own deficiencies.
Q&A: Refocusing physician-patient communicationIn the book, “What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear,” Danielle Ofri, an associate professor of medicine at the New York University School of Medicine, examines the state of physician-patient communication and what can be done to reduce the distractions and get back to focusing on improving the patient’s health.
Patients increasingly disrespectful to physiciansTo get ready, we are teasing each challenge and how it has affected the healthcare industry. Read on to find out how physicians have been struggling to manage patient satisfaction, and lack thereof, this year.
Here’s how physicians can combat patient gripesI was recently inspired by another article in Medical Economics, and curiously, have a solution for each legitimate gripe, based on decades of sorting through the combatants in this health-care disaster we’re engaged in on a daily basis.
Four ways to embrace patient consumerismHere’s how health systems can provide patients with ways to improve their overall financial experience as the frustration around high-deductible health plans continue to encourage patient consumerism.
How to provide patients the up-front price of treatmentPhysicians should consider revealing prices to meet.
How can physicians combat industry shortages and meet patient demands?
How can physicians combat industry shortages and meet patient demands?In the next few years, a major shortage of primary care physicians will sweep across the United States. By 2025, the number of physicians needed will fall short by 46,000 to 90,000, according to a recent study from the Association of American Medical Colleges.
Top 11 gripes physicians have with patients
Top 11 gripes physicians have with patientsWe asked primary care physicians from around the country what their top gripes with patients have been, and their answers may surprise you—or relate to you wholeheartedly. Read on to find out what they had to say.