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Ocular Allergy Resource Center

The increasing role of climate, hygiene, and aerobiology in allergyWith Earth’s climate change, both higher temperature and carbon dioxide levels have been inducing vigorous amounts of allergen production from multiple plant and tree species blooming faster than expected for at least the past 160 years.
Dual-acting, anti-allergy agent delivers efficacy, safety, convenienceOlopatadine 0.2% is a well-tolerated, safe, and effective antihistamine/mast cell stabilizer for treating mild to severe allergic conjunctivitis in children and adults.
Anti-allergic agent alcaftadine stronger in relief of ocular itchingIn head-to-head clinical assessments, alcaftadine was found to be statistically and clinically superior to olopatadine for relief of allergic conjunctivitis.
Novel dexamethasone punctum plug for ocular allergy shows promiseA novel dexamethasone-eluting punctum plug was safe and showed some evidence of efficacy for relieving signs and symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis in a phase II study.
3 tips to navigate the allergy discussion with kidsHow often do you ask a child in the exam chair if her eyes were ever itchy or watery? When I started to ask this question to every patient in my pediatric population, it was quite evident that there was an undiscovered gold mine in my anterior segment practice. Allergies in the pediatric population are trending upward in a startling and truly dangerous manner.
What's trending in ocular allergy treatmentThe advent of spring yields the annual pilgrimage of patients into our offices complaining of the itchy, watery eyes of allergy. As any eyecare practitioner can attest, ocular allergy is one of the most common presentations to an eyecare practice.
Nonpharmacologic care for ocular allergiesAllergic diseases have greatly increased in industrialized countries. About 30 percent of people suffer from allergic symptoms, and from 40 to 80 percent of these have ocular symptoms.1 We all prescribe topical medicines for our patients with ocular allergies; their use has become almost second nature. These medications do a truly remarkable job of helping our patients who suffer from seasonal or perennial ocular allergies. I like to temper these pharmacologic recommendations with some common sense ideas that will complement the pharmacological treatment and greatly alleviate the patient’s symptomatology.
Tacrolimus drops associated with improvement of refractory allergic ocular diseaseAccording to a study recently published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology from Kochi Medical School in Japan, “tacrolimus eye drops are highly effective in treating allergic conjunctivitis with proliferative lesions and/or corneal involvement, and may reduce or replace topical steroid use.”
Nasal sprays for allergiesLike a lot of folks, I suffer from seasonal allergies. While the red, watery eyes do spring up (no pun intended), this time of year I am much more bothered by the constant, unrelenting runny nose accompanying my seasonal allergy attacks. Which shouldn’t be surprising. —42% of patients suffering from allergic conjunctivitis also experience symptoms of allergic rhinitis (AR).
Immunotherapy: Does it play a role in ocular allergy?Numerous clinical trials are under way that may help to define the role of immunotherapy in ocular allergy.