metabolic syndrome

Get smart about metabolic syndrome!As pediatricians we are all too aware of our nation’s struggle with childhood overweight and obesity. Approximately 1 of every 5 children that we see in the office every day is obese. Despite tremendous efforts to reverse this trend, it is clear we are in this battle for the long haul.
Factoring the metabolic X syndrome
Factoring the metabolic X syndromeAlthough there is debate surrounding the definition of metabolic X syndrome in pediatrics and there are few long-term studies of outcomes in children with metabolic syndrome, pediatric metabolic syndrome needs to be on the radar of all pediatricians interested in ensuring a healthy adult life for their patients.
How to test kids for diabetesTesting glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) appears to predict children’s diabetes risk as well as fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour postload plasma glucose, according to a study on more than 2000 American Indian children.
How providers, payers, employers should be fighting obesityBy addressing the root problem of obesity with structured programs, providers can help patients lose weight and very possibly avoid expensive chronic illnesses as a result. Employers and payers should incentivize healthy weight by paying for obesity care and treatment, potentially reaping substantial savings in the long term.
FDA drug approvals-March 2015FDA actions in brief, breakthrough designation, recommended for approval, priority review, fast-track designations
Metabolic syndrome linked to increased risk of endometrial cancerAccording to a new study, women aged 65 and older who have metabolic syndrome may be at higher risk of developing all types of endometrial cancer.
How to prevent stone formation in patients with metabolic syndromeThis article examines the relationship between the metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease. We explain elements of the metabolic workup and practical strategies for prevention and management of stones in patients with the metabolic syndrome.
PCOS in adolescents: beyond the reproductive implicationsPCOS is likely underdiagnosed, especially in adolescent patients. It is challenging to make a diagnosis during the 1–2 years following menarche because normal pubertal changes can mimic features of PCOS.