medical education

Visiting professorships offer unique benefit to residents
Visiting professorships offer unique benefit to residentsUrology resident Nirmish Singla, MD, discusses the insight he’s gained from the experiences and perspectives of visiting professors and residents.
How to command patient trust while building experienceWhile questions about experience can be uncomfortable for new surgeons, Nirmish Singla, MD, believes the process of mastering procedures is invaluable to conveying the confidence necessary to help patients feel comfortable.
Research success during residency: Seven useful strategiesUrologic oncology fellow, Ariel Schulman, MD, shares some tips to help residents make research a positive experience.
Consider Choice E: Effective learning during residencyUrology resident, Nirmish Singla, MD, goes over some of the ways urologists can stay educated and informed in the infinite and dynamic curriculum that defines the medical field.
Population health prioritized as key aspect of medical trainingThe AMA and medical schools across the country are placing new emphasis on population health management and value-based care.
Is surgical training in ob/gyn residency adequate?With more procedures to master and less time to do so, are residents getting enough surgical training?
Medical schools tackle care costsCost issues work their way into medical school curricula
Why you should become a global mentor
Why you should become a global mentorHere’s an opportunity: Go to a foreign country and teach dermatologists about modern surgical techniques. Here’s the catch: It’s on your dime. Learn why derms should become global mentors and it's benefits.
NICU graduates: Be advocates for their healthcareCaring for the medically complex neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) graduates is a challenge for everyone: the very stressed parents and family members, physicians, physician specialists, nurse practitioners, nurses, and early intervention specialists including physical therapists, occupational therapists, and education specialists.
The lost art of medicineClinicians should practice the art of medicine, which seems harder in these times of declining reimbursements and the proliferation of new shiny toys we can use, and charge for, to measure aspects of the tear film. If that sounds like advice from a dinosaur, I’m proud of it.