Editor’s Note:

Welcome to Medical Economics' blog section which features contributions from members of the medical community. The views expressed in these blogs are those of their respective contributors and do not represent the views of Medical Economics or UBM Medica.

Med Ec Blog

Perils of replacing physicians with non-physician providersUnfortunately, the focus on increasing nursing scope of practice has led to several dangerous consequences. The first adverse effect of increased NP production is a decline in bedside nurses, one of the most critical components of our healthcare system.
Putting process over patients continues to hurt healthcare
Putting process over patients continues to hurt healthcare American ingenuity in healthcare over the last two decades has caused a number of problems in dire need of solutions.
The paradox in American healthcare
The paradox in American healthcareOur medical care system works poorly for most chronic medical illnesses and it costs far too much.
To curb opioid abuse, new technologies must be embraced
To curb opioid abuse, new technologies must be embracedThe opioid epidemic is exacting a lethal toll on the country. We must redouble and accelerate efforts to slow—and hopefully reverse—the current opioid epidemic.
Where will the healthcare debate lead us?
Where will the healthcare debate lead us?There has been much discord as to the proper role of government in healthcare.
How to use price transparency to attract patients
How to use price transparency to attract patientsPrice transparency and sales funnels—what do these have in common?
A concierge physician's advice for battling burnoutEHRs can absorb your valuable time, hurt your bottom line and lead to burnout and a tragically foreshortened career.
Shining a Mirror on GripesAlthough it is the most fundamental of all things that physicians do, communicating has never been a teaching priority in medical school. The result is that we blame patients for our own deficiencies.
Political correctness’ collateral damage in healthcareIn all aspects of healthcare, we must be able to listen to, and keep confidential, anything that a patient shares, in whatever form it comes. By the same token, we must be able to communicate frankly and openly with patients conveying the necessary message.
Here’s how physicians can combat patient gripesI was recently inspired by another article in Medical Economics, and curiously, have a solution for each legitimate gripe, based on decades of sorting through the combatants in this health-care disaster we’re engaged in on a daily basis.