maternal mortality

Maternal mortality statisticsData collection methods are improving but still a challenge.
Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in pregnancyManagement challenges in pregnancies complicated by maternal heart disease are complex, requiring ongoing involvement of a team of specialists.
A call to arms against maternal mortalityIf we truly want to “make America great again” we should start with a national effort to address our tragically high maternal mortality rate.
Introducing a new series on maternal mortality
Introducing a new series on maternal mortalityCutting-edge medical advances and innovative technologies have made headlines and continue to flourish in the new millennium. However, these medical achievements stand in stark contrast to the paradoxical increase in US maternal mortality, which is among the highest of all developed nations.
Do vitamin D levels affect ART outcomes?A recently published meta-analysis has found a relationship between a woman’s vitamin D levels and the success rate of assisted reproduction therapy (ART). Plus: Is progesterone effective in preventing preterm birth? Also: Results of a large cohort study show that women whose BMI is below or above normal before pregnancy may be at increased risk of complications or death associated with birth.
Three reasons why maternal mortality rates are risingBetween 1990 and 2013, the maternal mortality ratio more than doubled in the United States. Find out what experts say can resolve the issue.
The breath of life: Helping babies surviveThe first breath is the single most important moment in anyone’s life. It is when life outside the womb truly begins, the moment that makes all other moments possible.
Can a patient safety bundle prevent deaths from PE?Pregnancy-related deaths in the United States have risen from a low of 7.2 per 100,000 live births in 1987 to a high of 17.3 per 100,000 live births in 2013, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Pregnancy Mortality Surveillance System.
Home nurse visits decrease maternal and infant mortalityDisadvantaged mothers who receive regular home visits by nurses during pregnancy and through their child’s second birthday are less likely to die from all-cause mortality and their children are less likely to die from preventable causes than their counterparts who do not have such visits.