Kamra corneal inlay (AcuFocus)

Deeper implantation depth for inlay may enhance visual performanceA comparative analysis suggests placement of a cornea inlay (Kamra, AcuFocus) has improved patient satisfaction, refractive stability, and visual results when placed at 250 μm or deeper in the cornea. Shallower implantation depths may be more prone to refractive instability and lower patient satisfaction.
Managing presbyopia heading into the year 2020Patients don’t have to wait for 2020 to achieve 20/20 vision at near without spectacles or contact lenses. Rather, the advancements we have seen just in the past few years should be enough to help manage their expectations.
How has ophthalmology changed in 2016?
How has ophthalmology changed in 2016?As the end of the year approaches, we wanted to take a look back at the predictions our Editorial Advisory Board members made for 2016 and see how far we’ve come in the last 12 months.
New corneal inlay offers choice for presbyopia improvementAn implantable corneal inlay recently approved by the FDA gives ophthalmologists a new choice in treating presbyopia.
How will ophthalmology evolve in 2016?
How will ophthalmology evolve in 2016?Ophthalmology Times spoke with its Editorial Advisory Board members to get their thoughts on how the field of ophthalmology is growing, what advances they are highly anticipating, and what major hurdles ophthalmologists will face in 2016. A special thanks to Peter J. McDonnell, MD, Randall Olson, MD, Andrew G. Lee, MD, Sharon Fekrat, MD, and Robert K. Maloney, MD, for giving us a sneak peak at what the new year will bring.
Presbyopia therapy: Comparison of corneal versus lens-based optionsThe authors assess the quantitative and qualitative aspects of vision following various lens- and corneal-based therapies for presbyopia. In many cases the KAMRA corneal inlay offers a long-term solution. It can easily be removed if the patient is not satisfied with the outcome.
New correction option for presbyopes
New correction option for presbyopesAt present we are limited with our ability to treat presbyopes. Sure, we have progressives and multifocal contact lenses; however, from a surgical standpoint, monovision corneal refractive surgery is limited, and clear lens extraction is often extreme for emmetropes.
Corneal inlay technology offers new advantagesCorneal inlays to correct refractive errors are not new—various materials have been tried for more than 50 years to correct blurred vision. The greatest barriers to success of corneal inlays have been a lack of biocompatibility with the cornea, the difficulty of placing them within the corneal stroma safely, and refractive predictably.
Presbyopic-correcting devices poised for growing patient sectorBecause of the large number of patients who will need cataract surgery, many companies are designing presbyopia-correcting devices.
Small-aperture optic IOL broadens range of visionA foldable, hydrophobic acrylic IOL embedded with a small-aperture mask provided excellent visual acuity across all distances in patients who underwent monocular implantation after cataract surgery and was not associated with any visual symptoms that may occur with other presbyopia-correcting IOLs.