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iTech

Published by


iTech is a quarterly supplement with hand-picked related articles and resources, dedicated to the interests of ophthalmic technicians.

Featured

March 2017
In this issue of iTech:

  • My refractive journey as surgeon and patient
  • How to instill eye drops and avoid contamination
  • Help your patients out of their optical comfort zone

Previous Issues

iTech

Published by


iTech is a quarterly supplement with hand-picked related articles and resources, dedicated to the interests of ophthalmic technicians.

Featured

March 2017
In this issue of iTech:

  • My refractive journey as surgeon and patient
  • How to instill eye drops and avoid contamination
  • Help your patients out of their optical comfort zone

Previous Issues

iTech

How to be a the tech your doctor can’t live withoutOver the years of interviewing, hiring, and training staff, I realized that there are some technicians who are just adequate. They were for the most part reliable, usually made good decisions, and did their job adequately. Nothing more. I also noticed there were other technicians who were superstars.
Five things that make a great technicianI don’t want good technicians working in our clinic; I want the best technicians working in the clinic. Many people make the assumption that if they pass the JCAHPO, COA, COT, or COMT tests that they are good technicians. That might mean it would also be safe to say that the higher the certification, the better the technician.
The technician’s role with anesthesiaThe technician is usually the patient’s first contact in the clinic. He or she frequently will perform the initial history to include both medical and ocular conditions and may perform the initial stages of the exam, including dilating the patient. As the first contact, the technician has an important role in obtaining a good medical history and a detailed medication and allergy list. In addition, the technician needs to understand the significance of this information in preparing the patient for surgery.
Guide to maximizing patient satisfactionCultivating happy patients before, during, and after a visit to your clinic or practice is key to maintaining a profitable and credible practice.
The pros and cons of clear lens exchangeMore and more well-informed individuals are requesting lens extraction for refractive purposes even though their natural lenses are clear.
Addressing issues in the clinic to improve office moraleTo improve morale, managers need to have a pulse on the dynamics of the group and work on the issues that can cause daily frustration.
3 correction options for presbyopesThe treatment choices presented to presbyopic patients will depend on many factors, including lifestyle, profession, general attitude toward vision, and levels of disposable income. The first step is ascertaining which two of the three visual acuities are most important to them: near, intermediate, or distance vision. For example, you probably wouldn't recommend a multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) to a professional airline pilot because those lenses may compromise nighttime distance vision.
7 tips for leaving a patient alone in the exam roomWhen you leave a patient alone in a room, she is left to her own devices and is free to wreak havoc in your exam room if she so desires. Or look in places not meant for patients. You want your patient to be as comfortable as possible—but you want your exam room to remain intact.
Types of cataracts and their underlying conditionsA cataract is a clouding of the crystalline lens, resulting in vision loss. There are different types of cataracts, and they may be associated with underlying conditions. Understanding the differences between types of cataracts will improve clinical management of your patients.
‘Like’ it or not, it’s the talk of the clinicNowhere does it state in staff contracts that they have to like everyone, but they will work together professionally and kindly.