Health Policy urology

VA: APRNs may practice without oversightIn the wake of heated criticism about lengthy wait times for veterans’ care at Veterans Health Administration hospitals, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has moved to allow advanced-practice registered nurses to practice to their full authority without physician oversight and regardless of individual state law in VA facilities.
New HHS Secretary Dr. Price promises physician-friendly reformsTom Price, MD, would play a key role in repealing the Affordable Care Act and making significant changes to Medicare if confirmed as Secretary of Health and Human Services.
Committee seeks to ban concurrent surgeriesThe practice of performing concurrent and overlapping surgeries in hospitals and ambulatory surgery centers across the nation has come under scrutiny by the Senate Finance Committee, and hospitals and surgeons are on notice that some practices that may have been commonplace in the past need to change.
CMS data: Health care spending continues to riseRobert A. Dowling, MD, summarizes key findings from the recent CMS report “National Health Spending: Faster Growth In 2015 As Coverage Expands and Utilization Increases."
How Trump will change health care: UT’s board members weigh in“I am concerned about decreased federal support impacting urologic clinical practices and research progress,” Arthur L. Burnett, II, MD, MBA, told Urology Times.
How will health care change under a Trump presidency?"I don’t know what to expect from any aspect of the President Trump camp. There is so much vagueness in what he says," one urologist said.
MACRA leaves urologists confused, skepticalThe era of value-based health care has arrived. And while the idea of basing reimbursement on quality and efficiency rather than volume of care is good in theory, the majority of urologists say it will be difficult to carry out, according to Urology Times' 2016 State of the Specialty survey.
USPSTF reform: Will lame-duck Congress act?Over the past several months leading up to the November presidential and congressional elections, organizations representing urology sought to persuade members of Congress to bring sense and reason to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF), which nearly 5 years ago gave a “D” rating to PSA-based screening for prostate cancer.
Are you unhappy? Survey reveals why
Urologist elected to House, while docs’ numbers in Congress dropIn the 2016 elections, a urologist was elected to the House of Representatives but overall physician representation in Congress has declined to just 3%.