FLACS

FLACS offers enhanced surgical precision, patient safety, reliability Femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) offers surgeons a reproducible, noninvasive technique to replace the least predictable and most technically demanding steps of conventional cataract procedures. Do we absolutely need this technology to perform cataract surgery? No—but it certainly makes the job easier for us and safer for the patient.
Femtosecond laser use shows very low rate of capsule tears
Femtosecond laser use shows very low rate of capsule tears
Year in review: Cataract surgeryLooking back over the past year and into the near future, Eric D. Donnenfeld, MD, Robert H. Osher, MD, and Mark Packer, MD, spoke to Ophthalmology Times about developments in diagnostic products and other tools used in cataract surgery. In addition, they discussed combination microinvasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) and office-based surgery as new trends.
Why surgeons should not undersell their femtosecond laserWhen it comes to their eyes, patients want the safest treatments, and they know the best technology available is a laser. The cataract patient demographic is changing, and patients today have active lifestyles that demand functional vision.
Laser cataract surgery continues to transform capsulotomiesFemtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery will continue to lead the transition to a new era in ophthalmology with more precise, customizable, and reproducible capsulotomies.
Using femtosecond lasers in eyes with previous surgeryDr. Donaldson explains that prior corneal surgery does not necessarily indicate that FLACS would be ineffective. However, there are some immediate disqualifications to bear in mind.
New laser system simplifies astigmatism correctionAn experienced user describes the ease and outcomes of astigmatism correction using a proprietary femtosecond laser system.
IOL centration stable 30 days after implantation, study confirmsOphthalmologists spend significant amounts of time during cataract surgery trying to precisely center an implanted IOL to achieve the best possible vision after surgery. The high success rate of cataract surgery suggests that in most cases, they succeed.
How patient movement can interfere with femto laser-assisted cataract surgeryFemto laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) is a latest advance in technology that is transforming traditional cataract surgery into a refractive procedure. Multiple studies have shown that laser-assisted cataract surgery can increase precision and reproducibility of the anterior capsulotomy, reduce effective phacoemulsion time, cause less postoperative inflammation to the anterior chamber, and possibly reduce surgically-induced endothelial cell damage. However, it is discussed much less often that the safeguards built into FLACS instruments can fail and allow the femto laser grid pattern to be delivered into the cornea.
Was 2015 the year of inlays, FLACS, or something else?While 2015 may not have been the year for ground-breaking introductions or trials in the field of refractive surgery, plenty of improvements have kept the procedure an evolving process, Ophthalmology Times editorial advisory board members said.