episiotomy

Brain injury allegedly caused by forcepsWhen the head of a Kansas woman's baby did not descend easily, the nursemidwife managing the labor sought an obstetrician’s intervention. The obstetrician used forceps to assist the delivery. The parents sued the obstetrician after the delivery alleging the infant suffered a skull fracture, lacerated ear, bruising around his scalp, and bleeding in the brain as a result of the forceps. What's the verdict? Plus more cases.
Detecting abnormalities, documenting optionsA California woman was 35-years-old when she delivered an infant with severe Down's syndrome and then sued all those involved with the prenatal care and alleged that both physicians were told the parents wanted all available testing because of a family history of birth defects. What's the verdict? Plus more cases.
Claims data show episiotomy on the declineAnalysis of data from more than 2.2 million vaginal deliveries shows that episiotomy declined between 2006 and 2012 and nonmedical factors may have been at play. The findings were published in a Research Letter in JAMA.