emergency department

Pallor and swelling in an athlete’s upper armA 15-year-old female presents to the emergency department of a community hospital with acute onset of duskiness in her left arm.
Q-tips are still causing pediatric ear injuriesBetween 1990 and 2010, more than 260,000 children were treated in emergency departments (EDs) for ear injuries related to use of cotton-tip applicators (CTAs), according to data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.
Upgrade office triage to expedite careThis article describes how a mobile application, a “web widget,” and an office triage support tool can expedite and improve your existing office triage capabilities.
How one hospital reduced pediatric epilepsy emergency visits, admissionsNationwide Children’s Hospital sees dramatic drop in ED visits and inpatient admissions for epilepsy patients with collaborative quality improvement project.
Watchful waiting is cost-effective in acute otitis mediaA recent study found that taking a watchful waiting approach when managing acute otitis media in qualifying children proves to be the more cost-effective strategy to follow.
Pediatric call centers fast-track urgent careThe first call center was introduced in 1988 as a uniquely pediatric innovation. This month’s article presents a brief history of call centers, discusses their advantages, and describes how they will improve patient care.
Paramedics fight to combat ED visits, readmissionsParamedics can do much more than transport patients to the ED or inpatient care. Payers and providers are increasingly using EMS services to reach out to patients in their homes to improve outcomes and reduce costs.
Do retail clinics decrease emergency room visits?Retail clinics emerge as a way to satisfy the growing demand for healthcare created by the newly insured under the ACA, but contrary to expectations, they do not appear to be leading to meaningful reductions in low-acuity ED visits.
Increased opioid abuse leads to more ED visitsFrom 2006 to 2012, patients aged younger than 18 years made more than 21,928 visits to emergency departments (EDs) for poisoning by prescription opioids, such as methadone, codeine, meperidine, or morphine.
Mild gastroenteritis? Try dilute apple juice!Among children with mild gastroenteritis and minimal dehydration, initial oral hydration with dilute apple juice followed by preferred fluids is more beneficial than providing electrolyte maintenance solution, a large study in a pediatric emergency department (ED) in Canada found.