Editorial-Ophthalmology Times

Put to the testI have an idea. The idea is based upon what seems to be an almost-universally accepted belief that before there should be widespread use of surgical or medical therapies to treat patients with diseases, those therapies should first be vetted in controlled clinical trials involving a limited sample of the afflicted population.
Does the ‘compliment sandwich’ give better feedback?One approach that is sometimes recommended to give honest feedback is to deliver it between two positive comments. This is known as the “compliment sandwich.” While some advocates of this approach still assert its value, it is largely out of favor and is often ridiculed.
Maryland ophthalmologists are regular people
The doctor’s doctorA few months into my residency, a patient and her husband came to see me in clinic. The history revealed they had already sought the opinions of two internationally acknowledged giants in the field of retinal disease, one of whom was a department chairman. The answers they received on those visits had differed somewhat, so they were now coming to get the tie-breaking third opinion. “Thank goodness they have no idea I am just a first-year resident,” I thought to myself.
Have we dodged another Zika bullet?Now with mosquito season past in most parts of North America, it seems we can be confident the predicted spread will not come to pass—at least in this year.
Did JFK back pain cost his life?On Oct. 26, the federal government will release the last of the secret records on the Kennedy Assassination. Whatever revelations emerge from the estimated 3,600 files, one signature fact will remain: Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone gunman in Dealey Plaza. Still, new perspectives on the tragedy continue to surface, even after 50 years.
Evidence-based ophthalmologyWhy it is that ophthalmologists who read the same papers in the same journals have such widely varying approaches?
Dr. Mali's top 5 stories in ophthalmology in 2017 (so far)So far, 2017 has been a very exciting year for both ophthalmology and healthcare as a whole. We still have a few months left for more excitement, so stay tuned!
May the force be with you, too
May the force be with you, tooTomasso, a vitreoretinal surgeon, recently shared a blog by someone who calls him/herself “Neuroskeptic”.Neuroskeptic penned a spoof “scientific” article about midichlorians, which are the little organisms inside cells that give Jedi Knights (the good guys in the “Star Wars” movies) their powers (and unfortunately, confer those same powers to certain bad guys, like Darth Vader).
Something we may be missing
Something we may be missingMy friend, Dave, an oculoplastic surgeon, trained the same time I did. He was extremely intelligent and possessed a great sense of humor. A real jokester, he provided free cosmetic services to his office staff, and claimed in their presence that his treatments prevented them from frowning at him.