diabetic retinopathy

Know the benefits of adopting neuroimaging
Know the benefits of adopting neuroimagingNeuroimaging can help ODs better treat patients with possible tumor, vascular disorder, or demyelinating disease. CT scans are used for bone fractures and vascular disorders as well as orbital and pituitary tumors. MRIs are best gliomas and menigiomas and screening for vascular disorders. Communicate to radiology patient history and what you are trying to rule out when ordering tests.
The OD’s role with new diabetes drugsIt is important for eyecare providers to be familiar with these new drugs and findings. We often see patients with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and high CV risk, and we are in a position to help counsel our patients about new treatments—and even suggest that appropriate patients have conversations with their primary-care physicians, endocrinologists and cardiologists.
Using imaging to manage diabetic retinopathy
Using imaging to manage diabetic retinopathyCreating a partnership between the optometrists and retinal practices will enhance the care of patients and serve as a continuing source of education and reference for the OD community. This constant communication will help diabetic patients who are suffering from this multifactorial disease that affects their bodies. DR must be addressed from the optometrist’s point of view, retinal specialist’s point of view, and the primary-care physician’s point of view.
Aflibercept helps in ME patients with DR after cataract surgeryPatients with diabetic retinopathy have a high risk of developing macular edema after cataract surgery. Intravitreal injections of aflibercept might result in fewer patients developing macular edema in this patient population.
Tracking growth of ultra-widefield imaging in disease managementUltra-widefield imaging has become an important component of a thorough eye exam and is taking on a larger role in retina and comprehensive ophthalmology.
Novel therapies could stem burden of diabetic eye diseaseA better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of diabetes has resulted in improved control of its local and systemic comorbidities. Further developments are needed, however, considering the growing number of diabetic patients and who are at risk for late-stage diabetic eye disease.
Why the periphery matters in DR progression
Why the periphery matters in DR progressionDiabetic retinopathy (DR) in patients is a common finding in optometric practices. When we grade the level of retinopathy, we often do so with findings of the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS)in mind.
New strategies to assess the risk of diabetes-related vision lossA colleague recently told me that eye doctors should “stay within the lines” of traditional eye care because we barely have enough time as it is to do our jobs. My response was that today more than half of our adult patients have either diabetes or prediabetes, so our job now requires we go ”outside the lines” to avoid the leading cause of preventable blindness.
Aflibercept rivals laser for diabetic retinopathyIntravitreal aflibercept worked better than panretinal photocoagulation (PRP) for proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) in a new head-to-head trial, according to researchers.
Sustained-release corticosteroid implant improves, slows progression of diabetic retinopathySustained intraocular delivery of fluocinolone acetonide (FAc) using the FAc 0.19 mg intravitreal implant (Iluvien, Alimera Sciences) improves and slows progression of diabetic retinopathy (DR), according to findings of post-hoc analyses of data from the pivotal Fluocinolone Acetonide for Diabetic Macular Edema (FAME) trials.