diabetic macular edema (DME)

PALADIN subset finds improvement after 12 months with intravitreal implantAmong a subset of patients in the phase IV PALADIN study, there was improved visual acuity, improved macular thickness, and reduced treatment burden among patients treated with the intravitreal fluocinolone acetonide 0.2 µg (Iluvien implant) for DME.
Treat-and-extend protocol reduces burden of anti-VEGF treatment for DMEResults of the prospective TREX-DME study provide an evidence base for using a treat-and-extend protocol for administering anti-VEGF injections for eyes with diabetic macular edema.
Suprachoroidal corticosteroid shows visual, anatomic improvements in DME eyesSuprachoroidal triamcinolone acetonide (CLS-TA, Clearside Biomedical) injection resulted in visual and anatomic improvements in eyes with diabetic macular edema, particularly in those that were treatment-naïve. Multiple injections of the investigational treatment were well-tolerated and associated with a low incidence of IOP elevation.
Electroretinography: Out of the laboratory and into the clinicOCT has many benefits, yet falls short of reliably diagnosing and managing retinopathies and glaucoma. ERG remains the stalwart method for this application and this article highlights how technological advancements have enabled its introduction to the clinic.
Improving visual function, retinal integrity in DME patient
Improving visual function, retinal integrity in DME patientDiagnosing and treating diabetic macular edema (DME) can pose a challenge for ODs. A. Paul Chous, OD, MA, FAAO, CDE, examines a case of non-center involved DME and the challenges he faced when treating one patient.
Ziv-aflibercept for DME provides BCVA gains, lower dosing burdenResults of a 1-year randomized controlled trial investigating treatment for diabetic macular edema (DME) show that intravitreal ziv-aflibercept (Zaltrap, Sanofi Genzyme) 1.25 or 2.5 mg is safe, according to Masoud Soheilian, MD.
IRIS Registry gives glimpse into DME in real worldAn analysis of data collected in the Intelligent Research in Sight (IRIS) Registry suggests that in the real-world setting, newly diagnosed diabetic macular edema (DME) is being vastly undertreated. Not only are the majority of these patients not receiving active intervention, but those who are started on anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy seem to be getting a suboptimal number of injections, said Jeffrey R. Willis, MD, PhD.