Descemet's stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty

Infections with EK procedures risingDescemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) appears to have a higher risk of postoperative fungal infections (predominantly Candida) when compared to penetrating keratoplasty (PK).
Combined cataract/EK surgery may require modifications to techniqueCataract surgery in eyes undergoing simultaneous endothelial keratoplasty requires several modifications in techniques.
Three reasons for adopting DMEK in routine EK casesUsing the Descemet’s membrane endothelial keratoplasty (DMEK) procedure can produce better visual results and lower risk of rejection than using the previous methods (DLEK and DSAEK). The method has become easier to learn and use than in the past, and should be considered as the primary EK procedure for most routine cases of endothelial failure.
Graft failure: Techniques for best outcomes the second time aroundWhen a graft fails, surgeons have three factors to consider: the reason for the graft failure, the chances of success with a second surgery, and what has to be done differently to ensure the success of a new graft, said Francis Price Jr., MD.
Ultra-thin DSAEK delivers better results than standard DSAEKUltrathin Descemet’s stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK) is associated with faster visual recovery and better visual acuity in a study compared ultrathin with standard DSAEK.
New treatment reduces corneal oedema after cataract surgeryThe back layer of the cornea is made up of endothelial cells that keep the cornea clear. All cataract surgery does some damage to these cells, although due to the number of extra cells available in most corneas this damage doesn’t cause any problems. However, occasionally, post-cataract surgery endothelial cells don’t function well enough to keep the cornea clear, which can commonly cause corneal oedema. Here, Prof. Feinbaum describes a new treatment modality that has been designed to reduce and in most cases stop the oedema in 24–48 hours.
Simplifying the corneal alphabet soup
Simplifying the corneal alphabet soupWhen it comes to acronyms, there is no ophthalmic sub-specialty that compares to corneal surgical procedures. For example, let’s take a look at corneal transplants and therapeutic surface treatments. Among KLAL, DALK, PLK, LK, DLEK, DSEK, DSAEK, DMEK, and DMAEK, there is no wonder why there is so much confusion.