CXL

Epi-on CXL: Safe, effective option for treating thin corneasPatients with thin corneas as the result of keratoconus, ectasia following LASIK, or pellucid marginal degeneration can safely undergo epithelial-on collagen crosslinking with pulsed UV light and achieve visual benefits from the procedure.
Study: Not all topography devices are alikeSubclinical haze after CXL can affect corneal topography measurements; a comparison shows that measurements with four different devices cannot be used interchangeably.
Wavefront-guided PRK after CXL for keratoconusTechnique targets the main cause of vision degradation and a large clinical series finds positive results.
Keratoconus as refractive surgery: Thinking outside the ‘cone’
Keratoconus as refractive surgery: Thinking outside the ‘cone’In this first of a two-part series, Arun C. Gulani, MD, MS, explains how approaching keratoconus as a refractive surgery will change the way both ophthalmologists and patients will approach this condition to bring in a new era of not only relieving but also enhancing the lifestyle of this patient population. In Part 2, Dr. Gulani will share strategies and cases of patients with keratoconus with different case scenarios in action.
Treating refractive error with corneal cross-linking
Treating refractive error with corneal cross-linkingAfter much anticipation and a long wait for both clinicians and patients in need, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved corneal cross-linking (CXL) in mid April. This procedure is globally considered the only method of halting the progressive family of diseases called corneal ectasias, including keratoconus.
Binkhorst Lecture: Predicting, treating keratoconus in 2016The Binkhorst Lecture and Medal have been conferred since 1975 on “an individual whose career has made significant contributions to the science and practice of ophthalmology and established that person among the world’s most prominent ophthalmologists.”
A closer look at riboflavin application for corneal collagen crosslinkingCorneal collagen crosslinking with riboflavin works well but requires further exploration to identify the best approach for various types of patients.
Riboflavin delivery methods advance as techniques evolveTechniques for performing corneal collagen crosslink (CXL) are being evaluated and adapted, and at the same time, new applications are being developed.
CXL with epithelial disruption safely and effectively treats ectasiaCorneal collagen crosslinking (CXL) with epithelial disruption appears to safely and effectively treat keratoconus or iatrogenic corneal ectasia, according to a study recently published in Eye. In fact, patients may tolerate the approach better than they tolerate the technique involving complete removal of the epithelium, say the authors, from the Corneoplastic Unit and Eye Bank of Queen Victoria Hospital in East Grinstead, UK.
Intrastromal corneal ring segment 355° arc length expands keratoconus optionsEarly experience with a new intrastromal corneal ring segment arc length appears to be a valuable addition to the keratoconus treatment armamentarium for one surgeon.