corneal crosslinking (CXL)

CXL demands continuity of careCrosslinking meets the previously unmet needs of progressive keratoconus patients and provides an opportunity to increase engagement with optometrists, explain John Berdahl, MD, and George O. Waring IV, MD.
Top 10 questions about cross-linkingKeratoconus treatment has changed much over the past several years. Avedro’s U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of corneal cross-linking has given more patients hope for better vision.
How to manage vision changes over time post-LASIK
How to manage vision changes over time post-LASIKHow often have you heard a post-LASIK patient say his surgery “isn’t working anymore” or it has “expired?” While the corneal tissue that was ablated is gone forever, eyes can change over time, and laser vision correction does not stop time.
Risk review supports safety of corneal crosslinkingSevere complications are rare (< 1%) after corneal crosslinking for progressive keratoconus. Some are preventable, some are manageable, but some may lead to a need for corneal transplantation
Looking back at 2016
Looking back at 2016Before the new year gets too far along, let’s take a brief look at the happenings in the pages of Optometry Times during 2016.
Accelerated CXL rivals conventional techniqueResults from 2 years of follow-up in a large, prospective comparative study show that conventional corneal crosslinking (C-CXL) and accelerated CXL (A-CXL) are similarly safe and effective for stabilizing keratoconus progression in eyes with mild-to-moderate disease, said Tulika Chauhan, MD, at AAO 2016.
Epi-on CXL: Safe, effective option for treating thin corneasPatients with thin corneas as the result of keratoconus, ectasia following LASIK, or pellucid marginal degeneration can safely undergo epithelial-on collagen crosslinking with pulsed UV light and achieve visual benefits from the procedure.
Surgical pearls for CXL treatment of keratoconus, corneal ectasia
Surgical pearls for CXL treatment of keratoconus, corneal ectasiaOn the heels of the recent FDA approval of corneal collagen crosslinking, some surgical pearls are provided for the treatment of progressive keratoconus and corneal ectasia.
Treating refractive error with corneal cross-linking
Treating refractive error with corneal cross-linkingAfter much anticipation and a long wait for both clinicians and patients in need, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved corneal cross-linking (CXL) in mid April. This procedure is globally considered the only method of halting the progressive family of diseases called corneal ectasias, including keratoconus.
Keratoconus, crosslinking, and the changing treatment modelKeratoconus is perceived as having a small public health impact. With an estimated prevalence of ≥1/2000—considerably higher in certain parts of the world—that may be understandable.