corneal crosslinking (CXL)

Promising results for keratitis treatment with use of CXL, riboflavinIn a study with 10 patients, persistent infectious keratitis was successfully treated with CXL and riboflavin.
Customized CXL approach brings outcomes benefitsCustomized corneal crosslinking for keratoconus focuses the treatment on the weak area of the cornea.
Use of tomographic imaging can help detect keratoconus earlierTomographic imaging gives surgeons a fuller view of the eye, making it easier to detect early signs of keratoconus.
Managing repeat transplant failureWhen considering the Boston type 1 keratoprosthesis as the evidence-based procedure of choice for managing cornea graft failure, superior visual outcomes must be weighed against greater risk of sight-threatening complications.
Ten-year data promising in combined CXL approach for keratoconusClinicians evaluated the refractive, pachymetric, topometric, and visual rehabilitation changes with the Athens Protocol applied in patients with keratoconus. Joanna Kontari, MD, highlights some of the research findings and implications.
CXL demands continuity of careCrosslinking meets the previously unmet needs of progressive keratoconus patients and provides an opportunity to increase engagement with optometrists, explain John Berdahl, MD, and George O. Waring IV, MD.
Top 10 questions about cross-linkingKeratoconus treatment has changed much over the past several years. Avedro’s U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of corneal cross-linking has given more patients hope for better vision.
How to manage vision changes over time post-LASIK
How to manage vision changes over time post-LASIKHow often have you heard a post-LASIK patient say his surgery “isn’t working anymore” or it has “expired?” While the corneal tissue that was ablated is gone forever, eyes can change over time, and laser vision correction does not stop time.
Risk review supports safety of corneal crosslinkingSevere complications are rare (< 1%) after corneal crosslinking for progressive keratoconus. Some are preventable, some are manageable, but some may lead to a need for corneal transplantation
Looking back at 2016
Looking back at 2016Before the new year gets too far along, let’s take a brief look at the happenings in the pages of Optometry Times during 2016.