corneal crosslinking (CXL)

Looking back at 2016
Looking back at 2016Before the new year gets too far along, let’s take a brief look at the happenings in the pages of Optometry Times during 2016.
Accelerated CXL rivals conventional techniqueResults from 2 years of follow-up in a large, prospective comparative study show that conventional corneal crosslinking (C-CXL) and accelerated CXL (A-CXL) are similarly safe and effective for stabilizing keratoconus progression in eyes with mild-to-moderate disease, said Tulika Chauhan, MD, at AAO 2016.
Epi-on CXL: Safe, effective option for treating thin corneasPatients with thin corneas as the result of keratoconus, ectasia following LASIK, or pellucid marginal degeneration can safely undergo epithelial-on collagen crosslinking with pulsed UV light and achieve visual benefits from the procedure.
Surgical pearls for CXL treatment of keratoconus, corneal ectasia
Surgical pearls for CXL treatment of keratoconus, corneal ectasiaOn the heels of the recent FDA approval of corneal collagen crosslinking, some surgical pearls are provided for the treatment of progressive keratoconus and corneal ectasia.
Treating refractive error with corneal cross-linking
Treating refractive error with corneal cross-linkingAfter much anticipation and a long wait for both clinicians and patients in need, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved corneal cross-linking (CXL) in mid April. This procedure is globally considered the only method of halting the progressive family of diseases called corneal ectasias, including keratoconus.
Keratoconus, crosslinking, and the changing treatment modelKeratoconus is perceived as having a small public health impact. With an estimated prevalence of ≥1/2000—considerably higher in certain parts of the world—that may be understandable.
Consider matrix therapy for corneal crosslinkingTopical regenerating agent eye drops speed up the corneal healing and reduce ocular discomfort after the epi-off crosslinking but more research is needed.
New study finds limits of keratometry in keratoconusReproducibility of keratometry is better for early keratoconus than for advanced keratoconus, a new study showed. The study could help clinicians decide when to use corneal cross-linking in their efforts to stop the progression of the disease, wrote Tom H. Flynn, PhD, and his colleagues from the Corneal Service, Moorfields Eye Hospital, St. George’s Hospital, London. They published their finding in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.
Use of Bowman layer implantation promising for advanced keratoconusResults were encouraging from patients in a small study group receiving Bowman layer implantations to treat advanced keratoconus.