cornea

Finding alternative techniques for eyes with failed PKCornea surgeons encountering a patient with failed penetrating keratoplasty (PK) will wonder if they should repeat the PK. Although there are some exceptions to the rule, according to Donald T.H. Tan, MD, the answer is “no.”
Considering scleral lenses for astigmatic patientsWe have witnessed a rise in clinical utilization of scleral lenses in recent years, and in some cases, their clinical indications have expanded to include even those patients with regular corneas. Given this sharp rise in scleral lens utilization, the principle of lens selection continuum as proposed by Visser et al appears to also hold true in patients with normal healthy eyes. Thus, when should clinicians reach for scleral lenses when providing care to patients with regular corneas?
Deeper implantation depth for inlay may enhance visual performanceA comparative analysis suggests placement of a cornea inlay (Kamra, AcuFocus) has improved patient satisfaction, refractive stability, and visual results when placed at 250 μm or deeper in the cornea. Shallower implantation depths may be more prone to refractive instability and lower patient satisfaction.
Vector planning delivers superior outcomes for myopic astigmatismExcimer laser treatments using vector planning resulted in less corneal astigmatism, less refractive cylinder, and better unaided visual acuity postoperatively than treatments using manifest refractive treatment parameters alone, according to Noel Alpins, MD.
Death of the pressure patch has been slightly exaggerated
Death of the pressure patch has been slightly exaggeratedBest practice guidelines are just that—guidelines. They’re not religious dogma designed to herd everyone into the same line. We are rightly moving toward more evidence-based medicine, such as increased use of bandage lenses and less pressure patching in the management of corneal abrasions and erosions.