cancer screening

Here’s a more effective way to test for HPVA Kaiser Permanente study found that a new way to test for HPV has the potential to increase efficiency and decrease waste.
Things that impact racial, ethnic disparities in cancer survivalOne study seeks to understand the underlying causes of racial and ethnic disparities in cancer survival. The results may be surprising.
Readers React: In defense of breast density notification lawsWe read with interest the article “Breast density laws: Are you in compliance?” [December 2016 Contemporary OB/GYN]. We appreciated the perspective of our gynecologist colleagues. We would like to help clarify and give context to some of the information in the article.
Should women over 65 be screened for cervical cancer?A study questions the existing guidance saying only women over 65 years who have risk factors should be screened for cervical cancer. Also, do placental syndromes increase the risk of cardiovascular disease? Plus: A look at Gardisil 9's safety profile.
Researchers discuss ‘less is more’ cancer treatment approachMost patients hear the word “carcinoma” or “cancer” and believe they may die if they do not seek treatment. But ASCO researchers say that may be a problematic mentality.
Skin cancer screenings target marathoners
Skin cancer screenings target marathonersExpert offers colleagues insight about the runner’s mentality on sunscreen and best practices for educating your local community
United States scores barely passing grade on premature birthThe March of Dimes releases their annual report card on the United States and prematurity. Plus: Can anything be done about HPV vaccine rates? Also, a look at the place of ultrasound in breast cancer detection.
Ramifications of pelvic exam guidelinesHave pelvic guideline changes led to a reduction in other recommended screenings? Plus, how does menopause impact future cardiovascular health? And: Does childhood stress lead to negative obstetric outcomes?
Cervical cancer screening guidelines largely align, with one exceptionClinical guidelines recently put forth by the American College of Physicians indicate that Pap tests should remain the mainstay of cervical cancer screening in average-risk patients under the age of younger than 30 with HPV testing reserved for older patient populations.
Despite ACA, Americans still skip cancer screeningsEven though cancer screenings have become more available because of the Affordable Care Act, the percentage of adults getting certain cancer screenings has not increased significantly since 2010.