atopic dermatitis

New products expand drug and device categoriesThe therapeutic armamentarium for dermatologic diseases continues to expand with the approval of several new products in 2015, and there appear to be more promising treatments on the horizon.
What we know today about applying oils to newborn skinThe use of olive or sunflower oil on newborn babies’ skin damages the skin barrier, researchers from the University of Manchester recently reported. This latest study adds to the conflicting information around caring for newborn skin and how to manage conditions like atopic dermatitis. Learn more
The good, the bad, the ugly of alternative therapies
The good, the bad, the ugly of alternative therapiesAsk your patients about their use of alternative/complementary therapies, which are often helpful but can cause or worsen skin problems.
Trending therapies for atopic dermatitisBeyond the current approaches, recent phase 3 data has become available on a new topical while another injectable drug is under development, and both appear very promising.
Staphylococcus aureus infections in atopic dermatitisStaphylococcus aureus plays an important role in the pathogenesis and course of atopic dermatitis. Compared to the normal pediatric population, atopic patients are especially susceptible to colonization and recurrent infections of S aureus.
Managing severe pediatric atopic dermatitisOlder non-specific immunomodulatory drugs and off-label use of several biologic agents offer treatment options for children with severe atopic dermatitis (AD). However, the future should bring therapies specifically developed for treatment of AD investigated in children.
Biologic use beyond psoriasis
Biologic use beyond psoriasisFive severe conditions show positive response. More to come…
Rheumatoid arthritis drug may benefit atopic dermatitis patientsPatients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD)—or eczema—may be successfully treated using a rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drug recently shown to reverse 2 other skin conditions, vitiligo and alopecia areata, according to findings published early online in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
Pediatric psoriasis, eczema: Triggers and therapiesIn part two of our discussion, Kelly Cordoro, M.D., associate professor of dermatology and pediatrics at the University of California in San Francisco, discusses environmental and microbial triggers and when to choose systemic therapies with Dermatology Times editorial advisor, Elaine Siegfried, M.D.
Probiotics for healthy skinProbiotics, which are helpful bacteria that protect the body from harmful bacteria, are literally everywhere. In light of increasing antibiotic resistance due to over- and misuse, coupled with patients’ preferences for more holistic, natural approaches to healing, are we entering an era of anti-antibiotics and pro-probiotics?