atopic dermatitis

Pediatric dermatology updatesIn this article, Drs. Lawrence Eichenfield and Jessica Sprague review some of the most significant findings and developments in pediatric dermatology from the last year beginning with the availability of biologic agents for pediatric psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.
Patient dosing begins for Phase 2 study of new topical gel for atopic dermatitisThe first patient has been dosed in the phase two study of PR022 (hypochlorous acid, Realm Therapeutics), a topical gel treatment for patients with atopic dermatitis.
Azathioprine and methotrexate safe and effective for atopic dermatitisA small study finds that the combination of methotrexate and azathioprine is safe and effective as maintenance treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis for up to five years.
Can you identify atopic dermatitis phenotypes in children?In this slideshow, we summarize the phenotypes associated with childhood atopic dermatitis as addressed recently in JAMA Pediatrics.
Racial and ethnic disparities abound in eczema careEczema affects around 11% of children overall, but only about half of minority children with severe eczema are treated for the condition. A new study looks at why these children are overlooked.
In atopic dermatitis, are you employing the therapeutic ladder approach?Treatment for atopic dermatitis isn’t always straightforward. In this article, a physician outlines treatment approaches.
Atopic dermatitis: Biologics to watch in 2018In this article, we take a look at the development of new treatments for atopic dermatitis.
Manuka honey tested as AD treatmentA pilot study shows that Manuka honey may have some healing properties in atopic dermatitis.
An AD treatment phobia that is a “phenomenon”Atopic dermatitis patients have a phobia of topical corticosteroids that is so strong, it’s been described as a “phenomenon.”
Atopic dermatitis phenotypes may indicate outcomesChildren under two years old with signs of atopic dermatitis have an increased risk of developing asthma and food allergies, researchers report in JAMA Pediatrics. And, young children with both early onset atopic dermatitis and a food allergy, have a “very high risk” of developing asthma or allergic rhinitis.