American Academy of Pediatrics

Universal autism screening and early intervention supported by AAPDespite recommendations from federal overseers that universal autism screening has little benefit, experts in autism remain steadfast in their belief that early screening and intervention improves outcomes.
Talk the talk: Early language exposure impacts brain developmentIt’s no secret that babies love to look at their parents’ faces and hear their voices, but pediatricians are now being challenged to help parents understand that what they say to their children in the first years of their life can have a lasting effect on their brain development and scholastic achievement.
Bright Futures update focuses on health promotion, social determinantsWhen it comes to setting the tone for wellness, health promotion, and disease prevention, Bright Futures is a valuable resource for both clinicians and families.
Tuberculosis: What to do and when to call for helpWhile tuberculosis is not something all pediatricians see in daily practice, it remains a threat in some populations, and pediatricians should be aware of the risk factors and diagnostic recommendations.
Hematuria and proteinuria: Commonplace or cause for concern?Although pediatricians should no longer be routinely performing universal urine screenings in children, there are times that urinalysis is performed and abnormal results are found.
FDA eyes opioids in kids' medicinesAn FDA committee will review prescription opioid products containing hydrocodone or codeine to treat coughs in children.
Opinion: 4 reasons to revitalize the Children’s Health Insurance ProgramAs legislative discussions begin regarding the reauthorization of CHIP, it is imperative to keep in mind how proposed cuts could be detrimental to the health and future of our nation’s children.
Get response ready for the anaphylactic momentEvery nurse practitioner should review the AAP guidelines and include an action plan in each of their practice settings. All providers should communicate information to all school, camp, and field nurses who are often the first to assess a child presenting with symptoms of anaphylaxis outside a medical facility.
AAP's first-ever action plan for epinephrine and anaphylaxis
AAP's first-ever action plan for epinephrine and anaphylaxisAnaphylaxis is a serious, life-threatening allergic reaction that can occur suddenly without warning. In children and adolescents, the leading cause of anaphylaxis is exposure to food allergens. Recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published 2 clinical reports that discuss guidance on appropriate epinephrine use for anaphylaxis and developing an emergency action plan for patients at risk.
Choosy mothers choose . . . fruit!Since the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) published its first recommendations regarding fruit juice 16 years ago, pediatricians have been waving off parents from serving young children apple and other fruit juices in bottles and sippy cups, encouraging water be given instead, because of both caloric and dental caries concerns. Now the AAP has issued a new policy statement that goes further than ever on what constitutes optimal quantities of fruit juice product consumption for children of all ages.