access to care

Refugee children deserve compassionate carePediatricians can help children fleeing to the United States with medical and social needs, as well as acting as their advocate.
Bridging the gapBrainstorming with others on our medical team, we sought to bridge the gap between hospital and MH for our pediatric patients.
Parent mentors get uninsured kids insuredCompared with traditional Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) outreach, the use of parent mentors (PMs) raises rates of insured minority children and improves healthcare access along with providing other benefits—including cost effectiveness—a new study shows.
Does Medicaid mean poorer care?Although low-income families gained greater access to private insurance since the passage of the Affordable Care Act, a new study urges caution for policymakers looking to replace public programs that outshine private insurance for children’s healthcare.
AAP care recommendations for foster care childrenChildren in foster care suffer from a wide range of physical, emotional, and developmental impairments but generally receive inadequate care before, during, and after foster care placement. Early and frequent intervention by pediatricians is key to mitigating the trauma these children suffer and to improve long-term outcomes.
Telemedicine: Good for the long haul?As the popularity of telemedicine grows, the American Academy of Pediatrics offers guidance on the best ways to use this emerging technology.
Enhanced medical home benefits high-risk children with chronic illnessCompared with usual care, comprehensive care provided to high-risk children with chronic illness substantially increased access to care and parent satisfaction and decreased by 55% the number of such children with a serious illness, a recent study showed.
Medicaid reimbursement impacts Pap, mammography screeningAn analysis of data from 46 states and the District of Columbia shows that the level of Medicaid reimbursement for office visits has an impact on likelihood of patient screening with Pap tests and other diagnostics for cancer.
New model emerges for hospital-based pediatric careIn the mid-1990s, David Monroe, MD, a pediatrician in Columbia, Maryland, remembers having to admit children with common diagnoses such as appendicitis, asthma, and pneumonia to hospitals 30 or more miles away. That was because Howard County General Hospital, the community hospital in Columbia, was struggling to maintain pediatric inpatient care.
Cost and lack of time keep women from seeing physiciansAlthough women are often thought of as the drivers for healthcare in their families, many face financial and logistical barriers to obtaining healthcare for themselves, according to a new study by the Kaiser Family Foundation.