AAP 2017 Annual Conference

Updated clinical guidelines for childhood hypertensionNew guidance for pediatric hypertension makes it easier for primary care physicians to identify children and adolescents with high blood pressure and manage them in an appropriate manner.
5 environmental neurotoxicants are potent health risksPediatricians know from their training that chemicals in the environment are important causes of neurodevelopmental and other health problems in children, but clinicians need to keep that information top-of-mind in daily practice and apply it in counseling and evaluation, said Philip J. Landrigan, MD, MSc, FAAP.
What’s new about pediatric appendicitisInnovations in the evaluation and management of appendicitis could lead to better patient care and improved outcomes.
Treatment updates for atopic dermatitis in childrenBecause the burden of atopic dermatitis in children is significant and can adversely impact a child’s normal socialization development, accurate diagnosis and effective treatment are vital.
Influence of social media on teenagers' body imageVisually oriented social media platforms created by their peers can have a significant negative impact on adolescents’ body image.
Pediatric chest pain and syncope: Know when to referWhat causes chest pain and syncope in children and adolescents, and how can pediatricians recognize and eliminate the causes that may lead to significant morbidity or even death?
New timeline for early detection of hearing lossEarly detection of hearing status in children is critical to prevent the significant detrimental effect on cognitive development it can have if not appropriately addressed.
Learn to identify noncutaneous vascular anomaliesEducation for pediatricians about vascular anomalies primarily focuses on cutaneous malformations and vascular tumors, but vascular anomalies also affect deeper tissues and organs.
Screen routinely for central neurologic disordersPediatricians are the frontline providers for identifying neurologic problems in neonates and infants.
Antimicrobials approved for children’s skin infectionsFor the first time in a decade, there are antibiotics newly approved for use in children with skin and skin structure infections that do not respond to conventional treatment.