AAP 2016

AAP 2016 Annual Conference

Best tech for pediatrics: 2016At the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exibition (NCE) in October, I again presented 2 workshops on office technologies, sponsored by the AAP’s Section on Advances in Technology and Therapeutics. I made every effort to make this year’s workshop a unique experience, showcasing some new technology while including some of my old favorites.
Pediatric hypertensionHypertension in children is not just a specialty problem. It's much more common in general pediatrics than community pediatricians might realize.
Wet pants and constipationThe relationship between the urinary tract and the lower gastrointestinal tract impacts urinary tract infections (UTIs) and urinary incontinence in children.
Antibiotics, UTI, and VURThe diagnosis and treatment of reflux in children with a history of urinary tract infections (UTIs) keeps evolving—it's hardly a settled issue. Regarding antibiotic prophylaxis in these children, said Saul P. Greenfield, MD, FAAP, FACS, the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) trial reveals that it may be better to overtreat than undertreat.
Brittle or battered?Many pediatricians need to step up their game in understanding and diagnosing rare disease processes whose symptoms can mimic those of child abuse.
Primary care psychopharmacologyEvidence-based guidance is available to help primary care practitioners provide psychopharmacologic treatment for behavioral disorders.
When to look harder at jaundiceEven though most babies with jaundice have uncomplicated jaundice, 18% of them will have their course complicated by hemolysis.
Family meals matterTeaching children healthy eating habits requires setting a good example by sharing meals with them, said Irene Chatoor, MD, FAAP, in her session "Food refusal: From picky eating to feeding disorders."
New weight-management algorithmThe long-awaited American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) weight-management algorithm for obesity provides a comprehensive, evidence-based translation for real-world use.
Bigger, faster, strongerProperly supervised strength training can help children both short-term and long-term, providing the foundation for an active, healthy life.