2017 EHR Report

Collaboration with doctors essential for EHRs to live up to their potentialMore than eight years and $27 billion dollars later, electronic health records (EHRs) can at best be called a moderate success.
Expecting a universal EHR standard is a childlike beliefYou have to admire Dr. Conway's childlike beliefs. Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny and one standard format for sharing electronic health data.
Doctors seek user-friendliness, interoperability from EHRsFinding an EHR designed solely for improving patient care remains a source of simmering frustration, judging by the results of the Medical Economics 2017 EHR Report.
Switching EHRs becoming norm in healthcare
Switching EHRs becoming norm in healthcarePhysicians changing systems due to mix of dissatisfaction and requirements of new employers
How to find the right EHR point personMinimize or eliminate EHR frustration by dedicating a “superuser” in the practice.
Tips on how to put patients before electronic paperwork
Tips on how to put patients before electronic paperworkPhysicians offer tips to prevent the EHR from becoming a barrier to meaningful interactions
The road to hell is paved with good intentionsWhen the HITECH Act was passed and implemented throughout the healthcare industry, the architects of the law had good intentions.
2017 EHR Report Card
2017 EHR Report CardElectronic health records (EHRs) now are a part of most medical practices, yet doctors remain unhappy with them. In the Medical Economics 2017 EHR report—our fifth—we let them explain why in their own words.
Poor design hampers EHR usability, doctors sayFinding an EHR designed solely for improving patient care remains a source of simmering frustration, judging by the results of the Medical Economics 2017 EHR Report.
Inability to share information across systems remains major EHR failureFinding an EHR designed solely for improving patient care remains a source of simmering frustration, judging by the results of the Medical Economics 2017 EHR Report.