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Which states require mandatory continuing education for nurses?


States and territories with mandatory CE are listed below, along with how many hours each requires within a given time frame. Some call for a certain number of hours to be devoted to specific topics, such as infection control or HIV, while others mandate CE only for nurses who work fewer than a given number of hours per year.

ALABAMA
24 hours/two years

ALASKA
30 hours/two years

ARKANSAS
15 hours/two years

CALIFORNIA
30 hours/two years

DELAWARE
30 hours/two years
—RNs
24 hours/two years
—LPNs

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
24 hours/two years
—RNs
None required
—LPNs

FLORIDA
24 hours/two years

ILLINOIS
20 hours/two years

IOWA
36 hours/three-year license
24 hours/license issued less than three years

KANSAS
30 hours/two years

KENTUCKY
14 hours/year

LOUISIANA
Five hours/year
—full-time RNs
10 hours/year
—part-time RNs
15 hours/year
—inactive RNs

MASSACHUSETTS
15 hours/two years

MICHIGAN
25 hours/two years

MINNESOTA
24 hours/two years
—RNs
12 hours/two years
—LPNs

NEBRASKA
20 hours/two years

NEVADA
30 hours/two years

NEW HAMPSHIRE
30 hours/two years

NEW JERSEY
30 hours/two years

NEW MEXICO
30 hours/two years

NEW YORK
Five hours/four years

NORTH CAROLINA
30 hours (or 15 hours and other nursing activities)/two years

NORTH DAKOTA
12 hours/two years

OHIO
24 hours/two years

PENNSYLVANIA
30 hours/two years

PUERTO RICO
36 hours/three years

RHODE ISLAND
10 hours/two years

SOUTH CAROLINA
30 hours/two years

TEXAS
20 hours/two years

UTAH
30 hours (or 15 hours and 200 licensed practice hours)/two years

WEST VIRGINIA
12 hours/two years
—RNs
24 hours/two years
—LPNs

WYOMING
20 hours/two years (or other nursing activities)

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