Modern Medicine Now Top Story

New products, advancements in dry eyeDavid Kading, OD, FAAO, FCLSA, discusses new products, studies, and patient education available to help combat dry eye disease.
Consider nursing home optometry as practice optionOptometric practice in the nursing home setting is not always very glamorous; however, there are many reasons optometrists might want to consider adding this specialty to their practice arsenal due to tremendous need.
Sunlight and its effect on eye healthAvoiding sunlight entirely appears to be a misdirection. Melanoma is inversely related to latitude and inadequate acclimation (i.e., increased melanization and epidermal thickening), which carries the risk of both melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer—common in northern latitudes.
How diabetes is linked to gut bacteriaGiven this abundance of nonhuman species living on and within our bodies, it is not surprising that there is a link between specific bacteria to systemic and ocular disease—including diabetes and diabetes-related eye disease.
EHR documentation challenges remainStudies show documentation remains a significant pain point for physicians, but technology developments on the horizon deliver hope for improvements.
Handling wearable data remains challenging for physiciansExperts predict an increasing number of patients will want, and need, to share data generated from devices, forcing health IT to find ways to keep up.
The real ROI of immunizationsVaccinating my patients almost killed my practice last year. I
Telehealth can aid population health growth in rural areasNew study highlights the challenges of taking care of rural patients and opportunities for rural providers to utilize telehealth.
Small practices can have big impact on population health programsAs communities build their population health infrastructure, one expert says small practice physicians are ideal partners to solve health issues.
Preparing your patient for PRKPhotorefractive keratectomy (PRK) was the original excimer laser procedure approved by the FDA—and is still a safe and effective treatment of refractive errors. PRK has the benefits of no-flap creation; therefore, there is no risk of flap complications.