Modern Medicine Feature Articles

Plastic surgery predictionsWhat will shape cosmetic medicine in 2018? We asked industry leaders to weigh in with what they think will drive aesthetic medicine’s evolution this year.
Recommendations for safer gluteal fat graftingA plastic surgery taskforce recently released recommendations for gluteal fat grafting, a procedure that has a significantly higher mortality rate than any other in the aesthetic space.
An alternative treatment for OICA new study examines an alternative to current treatments of OIC in abdominoplasty patients.
Are blockchain and AI the keys to unlocking interoperability in healthcare?
Are blockchain and AI the keys to unlocking interoperability in healthcare?. EHRs were intended to be a way to better track health data for hospitals, payers and physicians. Although they have good intentions, they often end up causing more problems than they solve.
Doctors lose either way in fight against opioid epidemic"This is what it's like to decide whether to prescribe opioid pain meds now."
Putting process over patients continues to hurt healthcare
Putting process over patients continues to hurt healthcare American ingenuity in healthcare over the last two decades has caused a number of problems in dire need of solutions.
The paradox in American healthcare
The paradox in American healthcareOur medical care system works poorly for most chronic medical illnesses and it costs far too much.
5 years and 50 blogs later: Big lessons from the real worldUrologist Henry Rosevear, MD, reflects on the three lessons he's learned in 5 years of practicing urology.
How important is urology/gynecology collaboration?"It’s absolutely important. Because we have so much overlap in our patient population, our patients are best served by us working together," says one urologist.
Tax law may threaten Medicare, provider pay"Perhaps the biggest Medicare reform concern for urologists is the potential for provider reimbursements cuts, a threat that has continued to loom over the health care community for some time," writes the AACU's Ally Lopshire.