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American Society for Reproductive Medicine Assisted Reproductive Technologies: A Guide for Patients, Revised 2011 (PDF)

This booklet will help your patients understand in vitro fertilization (IVF) and other assisted reproductive technologies (ART) that have become accepted medical treatments for infertility. Through these procedures, many couples with otherwise untreatable infertility have given birth to healthy babies.

 

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CLINICAL ARTICLES

 
 
Birth outcomes for IVF babies depend on technique, infertility diagnosis

Birth outcomes for IVF babies depend on technique, infertility diagnosis

 

Outcomes of singleton pregnancies in women who conceive by in vitro fertilization (IVF) depend on the technique used and the reason for infertility, a new study from researchers at Baylor College of Medicine shows. More...

 
 
Weight, race affect success of fertility treatment

Weight, race affect success of fertility treatment

 

Obese and minority women have less success with treatment for infertility than normal-weight women and Caucasian women, new research from Michigan State University suggests. More...

 
 
Coming soon: An app for predicting in vitro fertilization outcome

Coming soon: An "app" for predicting in vitro fertilization outcome

 

British researchers have developed a mathematical "prediction" model to calculate the likelihood of a live birth after IVF. The calculator application will be available for download on Apple's iPhones and other mobiles. More...

 
 
Clomiphene citrate use for ovulation induction: When, why, and how

Clomiphene citrate use for ovulation induction: When, why, and how

 

For more than 40 years, clomiphene citrate has been the first-line treatment for inducing or augmenting ovulation in reproductive-aged women with subfertility or infertility. More...

 
 

 

A public health focus on infertility prevention, detection, and management (PDF)

 

In 2002, 2 million American women of reproductive age were infertile. Infertility is also common among men. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducts surveillance and research on the causes of infertility, monitors the safety and efficacy of infertility treatment, and sponsors national prevention programs.

 

A CDC-wide working group found that, despite this effort, considerable gaps and opportunities exist in surveillance, research, communication, and program and policy development. We intend to consult with other federal agencies, professional and consumer organizations, the scientific community, the health care community, industry, and other stakeholders, and participate in the development of a national public health plan for the prevention, detection, and management of infertility.

 

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EDITORIAL SUPPORT

 

Patricia Fernberg

Editor
Contemporary OB/GYN