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Zoe Diana Draelos, M.D.
Zoe Diana Draelos, M.D., is a consulting professor of dermatology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, N.C. She is investigator, Dermatology Consulting Services, High Point, N.C., and a Dermatology Times Editorial Advisor and co-medical editor.
The effect of antibacterials on the skin
The microbiome is one of the most popular areas of skin research at present. Many dermatologic diseases are accompanied by abnormal microbiomes beginning with atopic dermatitis, says Dr. Zoe Diana Draelos in her monthly column, Cosmetic Conundrums.
The on/off button comes to dermatology
Dermatologists will need to understand new device technologies and incorporate them judiciously into disease treatment where appropriate.
Comprehending cleanser development
Soap has probably done more to improve world health than any prescription medication, says Dr. Zoe Diana Draelos in her monthly Dermatology Times column, "Cosmetic Conundrums."
Satisfying cosmetic safety
The FDA has proposed regulating the cosmetic industry, says Dr. Zoe Diana Draelos in her monthly Dermatology Times column, "Cosmetic Conundrums." This month Dr. Draelos examines three key questions about cosmetic safety.
What are GRAS ingredients?
Another way cosmetics insure their safety is by adhering to a list of substances known as GRAS ingredients. GRAS stands for “Generally Recognized as Safe” and indicates ingredients that are currently widely used in the marketplace without safety issues.
What tests do manufacturers perform to ensure cosmetic safety?
Cosmetic safety is very important since these products are used by millions of people worldwide. Think of all the cosmetic products in your bathroom and how many of them have caused problems through years of repeated use.
How are cleansers tested to ensure they do not damage the skin?
Cleansers are routinely tested prior to commercial release for mildness with the Forearm Controlled Application Technique (FCAT).
Common terms in skincare marketing: Hypoallergenic fragrance
Hypoallergenic fragrance is a term that may actually have some dermatologic relevance. Since the term literally means reduced allergy, not the absence of allergy, it can be used loosely.
Common terms in skincare marketing: Nourishing
Many facial serum formulations claim to nourish the skin; however, the term has no scientific meaning.
Common terms in skincare marketing: Sensitive skin
One of the most commonly used terms is “sensitive skin.” It is important for the dermatologist to understand the value of such terminology and the associated implications.

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