Lisette Hilton
Lisette Hilton, president of Words Come Alive, has written about health care, the science and business of medicine, fitness and wellness for 25 years. Visit www.WordsComeAlive.com.
A single drug may control skin cancer treatment costs
A $78 single course of topical fluorouracil for keratinocyte carcinoma and actinic keratosis lesions, could lead to a savings in the hundreds of dollars in follow-up costs.
How deep an SCC lies within the skin correlates to lesion length
This study, which may have direct implications for treatment, explains why some actinic keratoses recur and progress after superficial destructive treatments — like cryotherapy.
How deep an SCC lies within the skin correlates to lesion length
This study, which may have direct implications for treatment, explains why some actinic keratoses recur and progress after superficial destructive treatments — like cryotherapy.
Combination topical treatment reduces psoriasis severity
The fixed combination of halobetasol and tazarotene topicals significantly reduced the severity of localized disease with a favorable safety profile, shows a study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.
A combined approach for the Brazilian Butt Lift
Treating cellulite around the buttocks helps to achieve optimal results when gluteal fat grafting.
Make your medspa profitable
One expert shares four specific ways to hold your spa staff accountable to meet your medspa’s sales goals.
Beta-3 agonist significantly reduces urge incontinence
The oral beta-3 agonist vibegron, taken once daily at either 50 mg or 100 mg, is well tolerated and results in clinically and statistically significant reductions in daily micturitions, urge incontinence, and urgency episodes.
Investigational device shows promise for OAB
A nickel-sized leadless titanium device, implanted in patients’ ankles, could provide years of relief from overactive bladder syndrome.
Radiation dose escalation fails to improve OS in PCa
There were significant improvements among those studied on the higher radiation dose in terms of biochemical failure and distant metastases, however.
Revisiting Kybella
Kybella generated a lot of buzz when it was approved in 2015 as an injectable treatment for double chins. What do physicians have to say about it three years later?

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